Collections

Collections

The Fair Debt Collections Practices Act requires that debt collectors treat you fairly and prohibits certain methods of debt collection. Personal, family, and household debts are covered under the Fair Debt Collections Practices Act. This includes money owed for the purchase of an automobile, for medical care, or for charge accounts. A debt collector is any person who regularly attempts to collect debts owed to themselves or others. A collector may contact you in person, by mail, telephone, telegram, or fax. However, a debt collector may not contact you at inconvenient times or places, such as before 8:00 a.m. or after 9:00 p.m., unless you agree. A debt collector also may not contact you at work if the collector knows that your employer disapproves of such contacts.

You can stop a debt collector from contacting you by writing a certified letter to the collector telling them to stop. Once the collector receives your letter, they may not contact you again except to say there will be no further contact or to notify you that the debt collector or the creditor intends to take some specific action. Please note, however, that sending such a letter to a collector does not make the actual debt go away.

If you have an attorney, the debt collector must contact the attorney, rather than you. If you do not have an attorney, a collector may contact other people, but only to find out where you live, what your phone number is, and where you work. Collectors usually are prohibited from contacting such third parties more than once. In most cases, the collector may not tell anyone other than you and your attorney that you owe money.

Our firm will directly represent your interests and give you the most helpful advice. We will protect you from further harassment and unfair practices.