Wills

Wills

A will, or last will and testament, is a document that states your final wishes. After your death, a court will ensure that your final wishes are carried out. Without a will, state law will dictate how your property will be distributed. The general scheme is to distribute property to your spouse and children, or to your closest relatives. If no relatives can be found to inherit your property, it will be transferred to the state. For single parents, the state will also determine who will care for your minor children if the other parent is unavailable or unfit to do so.

To write a will, you must know what property you have and understand what it means to leave property, name beneficiaries for your property, sign the document, and your will must be signed by two witnesses. Handwritten wills are not recommended because they are more susceptible to being challenged after death.

Our firm helps you navigate state laws to determine what is required in your will, correct any technical deficiencies, and ensure that your will is properly witnessed. We guide you on the different types of wills available and how to properly execute them. Should you change your mind about the conditions of your will, we help you ensure the proper revocation or modification of your will.